Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] [NO] [MY] Topic: Frustrated CrossRunning  (Read 7348 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline v8guy

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
  • Bike: 2015 R1200RS
  • City / Town: London
  • Country: UK
Frustrated CrossRunning
on: October 08, 2016, 11:48:02 AM
So after 6 months with my 2015 bike, I've started a serious appraisal of whether I'm sticking with it.

Pros:
* it's such an easy, comfortable, practical bike
* good handling solo
* great engine

Cons:
* great engine, but lacking mid-range grunt
* fuel economy - OK if ridden gently, poor if bike used to full potential
* wind protection is terrible, even with powerbronze adjuster fitted (using MRA vario screen)
* rear shock is not up to the task of two-up riding
* still need to buy panniers
* weight

So.. for me to make this a keeper, I need make some compromises, and spend some cash.. Firstly, I need to accept the power delivery - I'm a daily commuter, in all weather and all states of mind. Ergo I cruise the mid-range power a lot. There are better engines for this usage - the CR does an adequate job, but at 50+mph, that weak mid-range really shows.

Panniers.. £500-700, rear shock £400-700, replacement screen £50-100. So, worst case, I'm looking at £1500 to improve matters.

By my reckoning, sale of bike + £1500 = an awful lot of s/h Ducati multistrada 1200, or a very nice KTM 990SMT.

Took a test ride on a Multistrada the other day.. oh my, what a bike! The engine felt entirely agricultural after hopping off the CR, but once acclimatised it was a pleasure. I'm used to a big twin (TDM) so I don't mind the vibes. Gearbox was not as smooth as the Honda, occasionally feeling very vague, but generally Ok. Handling was in another league.. CR does a pretty good job, but the Ducati was just sublime.

Jumping back on the CR after an hour on the Ducati.. sooooo much smoother, easier, civilised, but.. hm, just a bit dull. Still a fantastic ride though!

I've ridden KTM 990SM and 990 Adventure in the past.. the SM was not at all good in London traffic, the Adventure was great in Colorado mountains, but felt a bit underwhelming overall. Not convinced, although I could consider an 1190..

Anyhow.. I'm still pondering. Any thoughts welcome!  :002:
Current: BMW R1200RS, 2003 Yamaha TDM900
Past: Honda CLR125, Honda CB500, Triumph Sprint Sport, Honda VFR750FS, Suzuki DRZ400SM, 2001 Triumph Speed Triple 955i, 2015 Honda VFR800X

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube" - HST

Offline Throbber

  • Crossrunner Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
  • Bike: 2015 Crossrunner
  • City / Town: Bristol
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #1 on: October 08, 2016, 05:27:25 PM
Hi V8guy. As the owner of both a Ducati and Honda Crossrunner I’m happy to give my view on the 2 bikes for what it’s worth.   Firstly, I have a 1198 “Superbike” rather than the Multistrada but they do share 90% of the same engine and I did have a 1200 Multistrada on loan for a couple of days on one occasion.

I’ve had my Crossrunner for 3 months now and I do agree with your summary of the pros & cons of the Crossrunner – although I was largely aware of these shortcomings prior to buying.  It’s probably fair to say that whatever bike you have there are pros & cons.  I’m not sure anyone has found the perfect all-rounder. 

I guess it comes down to your reasons for buying a particular bike.  When I bought the Ducati I was so in love with the looks, noise and power that any other considerations went out of the window.  After 6 years I still love it and don’t envisage ever parting with it.  My 1198 has been near faultless in the 6 years I’ve had it.  The only issue was a leak from the radiator which was fixed under warranty with an upgraded part. The build quality is excellent and the dealer backup is fine.

A couple of considerations for the Ducati based on my experience:

If you’re looking for an economical bike to run, the Multistrada isn’t it.  Let’s start with Fuel consumption.  I can get 40mpg from my 1198 if I’m holding a steady speed on the motorway.  Show it a twisty road and 30 – 35 is more realistic.  Whilst the Multistrada engine in its slightly de tuned may be a little more efficient, it is pulling more weight so I wouldn’t expect you would see much different mpg figures to mine. 
Next, servicing.  If you think that a VTEC service on the Honda is expensive, just wait until the Ducati’s valves need doing.  I’ve just stumped up £1300 (yes, that is correct - thirteen hundred pounds) for the 15k service on the Ducati. Also, as the cams are belt driven, these have to be replaced every 2 years.  Not obscenely expensive at about £350 but another cost to factor in.

Everyday usage: For me the Multistrada isn’t an everyday commuter.  I’m sure the bike is up to it – I used to commute on my 1198 – but I couldn’t bring myself to commute through winter on the Multi as it’s just too nice a bike to use it for that.  The other possible issue is that the Ducati engine isn’t great at low speed town riding.  Very lumpy at anything under 40mph.  Also the engine gets very hot very quickly down at low speed.  Nice in the winter to warm you up but in the summer it can be a bit uncomfortable to the point of distraction. Everyday usability is the main reason I got the Crossrunner.  It just feels like it will take whatever you throw at it.  I like the fact that it isn’t constantly straining at the leash to do three-figure speeds.  And that it starts at the first push of the button every time.

The Engine.  It is a monster, as I think you’ve already discovered. Whilst this is possibly the bikes biggest ‘pro’, the downside is that you will find yourself constantly making good use of its stonking mid-range (assuming you’re not stuck in London traffic).  I’ve never owned a bike where I have felt so compelled to constantly travel so fast, so often. Trying to keep your speed to sensible levels can become quite stressful/tiring.

None of the above is intended to put you off – just to give you a heads up on the possible ‘cons’ of the Ducati.  I think all bikes have their ‘cons’.  Whether you can put up with or overlook them is very much a personal thing.  My way around the ‘problem’ was to get the Crossrunner as a second bike – to do the things the Ducati isn’t as good at.  If I had to choose, between the 2, I’d keep the Ducati.





Online Skids

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 1188
  • Bike: 2018 800X
  • City / Town: Hitchin
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #2 on: October 08, 2016, 05:35:37 PM
*Originally Posted by Throbber [+]
Hi V8guy. As the owner of both a Ducati and Honda Crossrunner I’m happy to give my view on the 2 bikes for what it’s worth.   Firstly, I have a 1198 “Superbike” rather than the Multistrada but they do share 90% of the same engine and I did have a 1200 Multistrada on loan for a couple of days on one occasion.

I’ve had my Crossrunner for 3 months now and I do agree with your summary of the pros & cons of the Crossrunner – although I was largely aware of these shortcomings prior to buying.  It’s probably fair to say that whatever bike you have there are pros & cons.  I’m not sure anyone has found the perfect all-rounder. 

I guess it comes down to your reasons for buying a particular bike.  When I bought the Ducati I was so in love with the looks, noise and power that any other considerations went out of the window.  After 6 years I still love it and don’t envisage ever parting with it.  My 1198 has been near faultless in the 6 years I’ve had it.  The only issue was a leak from the radiator which was fixed under warranty with an upgraded part. The build quality is excellent and the dealer backup is fine.

A couple of considerations for the Ducati based on my experience:

If you’re looking for an economical bike to run, the Multistrada isn’t it.  Let’s start with Fuel consumption.  I can get 40mpg from my 1198 if I’m holding a steady speed on the motorway.  Show it a twisty road and 30 – 35 is more realistic.  Whilst the Multistrada engine in its slightly de tuned may be a little more efficient, it is pulling more weight so I wouldn’t expect you would see much different mpg figures to mine. 
Next, servicing.  If you think that a VTEC service on the Honda is expensive, just wait until the Ducati’s valves need doing.  I’ve just stumped up £1300 (yes, that is correct - thirteen hundred pounds) for the 15k service on the Ducati. Also, as the cams are belt driven, these have to be replaced every 2 years.  Not obscenely expensive at about £350 but another cost to factor in.

Everyday usage: For me the Multistrada isn’t an everyday commuter.  I’m sure the bike is up to it – I used to commute on my 1198 – but I couldn’t bring myself to commute through winter on the Multi as it’s just too nice a bike to use it for that.  The other possible issue is that the Ducati engine isn’t great at low speed town riding.  Very lumpy at anything under 40mph.  Also the engine gets very hot very quickly down at low speed.  Nice in the winter to warm you up but in the summer it can be a bit uncomfortable to the point of distraction. Everyday usability is the main reason I got the Crossrunner.  It just feels like it will take whatever you throw at it.  I like the fact that it isn’t constantly straining at the leash to do three-figure speeds.  And that it starts at the first push of the button every time.

The Engine.  It is a monster, as I think you’ve already discovered. Whilst this is possibly the bikes biggest ‘pro’, the downside is that you will find yourself constantly making good use of its stonking mid-range (assuming you’re not stuck in London traffic).  I’ve never owned a bike where I have felt so compelled to constantly travel so fast, so often. Trying to keep your speed to sensible levels can become quite stressful/tiring.

None of the above is intended to put you off – just to give you a heads up on the possible ‘cons’ of the Ducati.  I think all bikes have their ‘cons’.  Whether you can put up with or overlook them is very much a personal thing.  My way around the ‘problem’ was to get the Crossrunner as a second bike – to do the things the Ducati isn’t as good at.  If I had to choose, between the 2, I’d keep the Ducati.

Hey Throbber, great post.

I would have said exactly the same except insert VFR1200 for your 1198. It's idiotically fast and with the suspension upgraded handles better than the 800.

But it will not be ridden in the winter!

The Crossrunner will be the perfect partner to the 1200 and will eat my daily commute through all weathers, reliably and comfortably.

Can't ask for more!  :152:
98 VFR800 - 130,000 miles (sold)
08 VFR800 - 76,000 miles (sold)
14 VFR1200 - 20,000 miles
15 VFR800X - 44,000 miles (sold)
18 VFR800X - 9,000 miles

Offline v8guy

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
  • Bike: 2015 R1200RS
  • City / Town: London
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #3 on: October 08, 2016, 06:43:31 PM
*Originally Posted by Skids [+]
Hey Throbber, great post.
Abso-bloody-lutely.. many thanks for the info, most helpful!  :028:

*Originally Posted by Skids [+]
I would have said exactly the same except insert VFR1200 for your 1198. It's idiotically fast and with the suspension upgraded handles better than the 800.
Hm.. I've considered having a go on a VFR1200F, as I suspect the engine will be right up my street... but how about a VFR1200X CrossRunner? Bring it, Mr Honda!  :001:
Current: BMW R1200RS, 2003 Yamaha TDM900
Past: Honda CLR125, Honda CB500, Triumph Sprint Sport, Honda VFR750FS, Suzuki DRZ400SM, 2001 Triumph Speed Triple 955i, 2015 Honda VFR800X

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube" - HST

Offline Throbber

  • Crossrunner Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
  • Bike: 2015 Crossrunner
  • City / Town: Bristol
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #4 on: October 08, 2016, 06:58:30 PM
No Problem. 1200 Crossrunner -have you checked out the 1200 Crosstourer?

Keep us posted with what you decide to do.

Offline v8guy

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
  • Bike: 2015 R1200RS
  • City / Town: London
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #5 on: October 08, 2016, 07:16:56 PM
*Originally Posted by Throbber [+]
No Problem. 1200 Crossrunner -have you checked out the 1200 Crosstourer?
I'm more of a touring-supermoto kinda guy, than a spoked-wheel-round-the-worlder. I find 19" front wheels a bit lazy to turn, for my taste.
Current: BMW R1200RS, 2003 Yamaha TDM900
Past: Honda CLR125, Honda CB500, Triumph Sprint Sport, Honda VFR750FS, Suzuki DRZ400SM, 2001 Triumph Speed Triple 955i, 2015 Honda VFR800X

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube" - HST

Online Skids

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 1188
  • Bike: 2018 800X
  • City / Town: Hitchin
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #6 on: October 09, 2016, 06:57:31 AM
*Originally Posted by v8guy [+]
Abso-bloody-lutely.. many thanks for the info, most helpful!  :028:
Hm.. I've considered having a go on a VFR1200F, as I suspect the engine will be right up my street... but how about a VFR1200X CrossRunner? Bring it, Mr Honda!  :001:

It's a great machine too, though I'm the same as you....not a Euan Macgregor wannabee.

The 1200F is an outstanding bike, very underrated by many but the engine is an absolute corker. 175bhp, a shaft-drive you wouldn't know was a shaftie, superb aerodynamics & engine heat management and Honda build-quality. I can get the same fuel consumption as my 800 on my 52-mile commute to work doing the journey in the same time and though the stock suspension may suit some, I've had MCT Suspension re-work front & back and she handles like the 800 now (which also has upgraded forks & a Nitron rear shock).

Definitely worth a try (2012+ model) and there's loads of used ones at great prices too.
98 VFR800 - 130,000 miles (sold)
08 VFR800 - 76,000 miles (sold)
14 VFR1200 - 20,000 miles
15 VFR800X - 44,000 miles (sold)
18 VFR800X - 9,000 miles

Offline v8guy

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
  • Bike: 2015 R1200RS
  • City / Town: London
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #7 on: October 09, 2016, 08:50:05 AM
*Originally Posted by Skids [+]
It's a great machine too, though I'm the same as you....not a Euan Macgregor wannabee.
The weight of the CrossTourer makes it a no go, for me. As far as Ewan-wannabee goes, indeed! Although I did test ride a Guzzi Griso 1200 once... such a lovely bike, but as practical as the proverbial teapot!

*Originally Posted by Skids [+]
The 1200F is an outstanding bike, very underrated by many but the engine is an absolute corker. 175bhp, a shaft-drive you wouldn't know was a shaftie, superb aerodynamics & engine heat management and Honda build-quality.
I remain unconvinced about returning to the ergonomics of a traditional sports tourer, but I really should go see how that engine feels. I loved my 750F, but I do like to sit more upright these days.

A BMW R1200RS was also on my shortlist before buying the CR, but was discounted as it was too expensive to buy new, there were next to none second hand at the time, and having sat on one I didn't much like the relatively low seat height. Never ridden a modern boxer twin (my friend's Ural was most certainly not modern!), but I suspect I'd like the power delivery.

*Originally Posted by Skids [+]
I've had MCT Suspension re-work front & back and she handles like the 800 now (which also has upgraded forks & a Nitron rear shock).
Wait.. your 800 has a Nitron shock? Nitron don't have a shock yet for either mk1 or mk2 CR.. I'm a big fan of their shocks, having fitted one to my TDM many years ago. I've asked them about the CR and they're happy to let me lend them my bike for dev, but the logistics are just not practical at the moment.


Current: BMW R1200RS, 2003 Yamaha TDM900
Past: Honda CLR125, Honda CB500, Triumph Sprint Sport, Honda VFR750FS, Suzuki DRZ400SM, 2001 Triumph Speed Triple 955i, 2015 Honda VFR800X

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube" - HST

Offline v8guy

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
  • Bike: 2015 R1200RS
  • City / Town: London
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #8 on: October 17, 2016, 03:04:33 PM
*Originally Posted by Throbber [+]
Keep us posted with what you decide to do.
I've spent the last week or so forgetting about fuel economy, and riding it like I did on my test ride. So much more fun, at a cost of only a couple of mpg per tank.

Thinking more about your comments, and more about how my Ducati test ride went... I think I'll be sorting out the suspension issues with the Honda and, cash permitting, shopping for a Multistrada 1000 or 1100 over the winter, as a bike for when I feel like it, rather than as a bike to depend on every day. :028:
Current: BMW R1200RS, 2003 Yamaha TDM900
Past: Honda CLR125, Honda CB500, Triumph Sprint Sport, Honda VFR750FS, Suzuki DRZ400SM, 2001 Triumph Speed Triple 955i, 2015 Honda VFR800X

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube" - HST

Offline Throbber

  • Crossrunner Member
  • **
  • Posts: 58
  • Bike: 2015 Crossrunner
  • City / Town: Bristol
  • Country: UK
Re: Frustrated CrossRunning
Reply #9 on: October 17, 2016, 04:19:41 PM
I think that's a good plan - you get the best of both worlds.  I think the Crossrunner is a great everyday bike, very capable and dependable.  Ducati's are great bikes to own but not the best everyday transport.  Good luck with the hunt for the Multistrada.

 



recent