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Offline Rico

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Hello cross runner enthusiasts. I've alway been interested in the cross runner, and am thinking about making a purchase this year. My budget restricts me to the older version really, so I wanted to hear your thoughts, on what the old bike lacks that the new one has. If anyone has ridden both, I'd be especially keen to hear your thoughts.

For example I hear that the older model is thirsty, is that true? What about the wind protection ?

Thanks in advance  :002:

Online Skids

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #1 on: February 13, 2018, 05:08:15 PM
*Originally Posted by Rico [+]
Hello cross runner enthusiasts. I've alway been interested in the cross runner, and am thinking about making a purchase this year. My budget restricts me to the older version really, so I wanted to hear your thoughts, on what the old bike lacks that the new one has. If anyone has ridden both, I'd be especially keen to hear your thoughts.

For example I hear that the older model is thirsty, is that true? What about the wind protection ?

Thanks in advance  :002:

Hi Rico

I owned an 08 Vtec VFR800, which had the same engine as the first model of Cr, so I'm comparing it to that. The newer model has the same engine as the 800F, introduced in 2014 and I think it is a much better engine. Much closer to the original 800 with gear-driven cams...more torque and a better delivery. Plus you can't feel the Vtec transition as much as you can on the older model, but there are things you can do to the older model to smooth that out, plus the newer model has fewer fuelling issues, especially at low throttle opening & cold. I agree that the newer model has a better fuel consumption too, but not by much.

I like the LED headlamps of the new model; not because they are better at night but because they are better in the day...they get the attention of cage drivers much better.

JMHO.
98 VFR800 - 130,000 miles (sold)
08 VFR800 - 76,000 miles (sold)
14 VFR1200 - 20,000 miles
15 VFR800X - 44,000 miles (sold)
18 VFR800X - 9,000 miles

Offline reasty

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #2 on: February 13, 2018, 07:22:21 PM
Interesting point re the vtec kicking in. I had the last of the pre vtec vfr's and read so much about the early vtec models having a real step when they cut in so avoided them. Fast forward to my advancing years and mk1 crossrunner - I couldn't describe it as kicking in, more of a nudge really. I love it  - the gift that keeps giving - makes overtaking audibly pleasurable😇

Online stubax

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #3 on: February 13, 2018, 07:25:26 PM
I have a 2015 model, had the earlier model previously. Liked the older model but prefer the newer model style wise although I think the older model had more character, the 2015 model is slightly better on fuel but the older bike always gave me around 50 mpg in normal use. Don't be put off the older model by the press reports, they never got it 😊

Offline Rico

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #4 on: February 13, 2018, 08:35:58 PM
Thanks guys, good tips! It sounds like the older model could be a good option. I would definitely prefer the integrated luggage attachment of the newer model, I don't get why most manufacturers took so long to start doing that, BMW have been doing it for ages.

Interesting point about the LED lights too, I always though they were mainly a looks thing, but being noticed more is definitely a positive.

One thing I do like about the design of the older bike, is that it didn't pretend to be something it's not. It didn't go super adventure, because it's more a street bike than an adventure bike. I do like the design of the new one, but they've had to add the inevitable beak, which seems to please the press more, and most riders, so fair enough.

Also think about the BMW f800r and f800gs, but that V4 is a long way better than the BMWs parallel twin.

Online Skids

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #5 on: February 13, 2018, 08:58:01 PM
*Originally Posted by reasty [+]
Interesting point re the vtec kicking in. I had the last of the pre vtec vfr's and read so much about the early vtec models having a real step when they cut in so avoided them. Fast forward to my advancing years and mk1 crossrunner - I couldn't describe it as kicking in, more of a nudge really. I love it  - the gift that keeps giving - makes overtaking audibly pleasurable😇

The pre-14 Vtecs were very variable with their Vtec engagement feeling; on one bike it would be a real event, on another you'd barely notice it. Perhaps one was a Friday afternoon build?  :027: :008:

The first models had the Vtec engagement and disengagement at the same rpm which caused a lot of hunting if you kept the rpm close the to engage/disengage revs. On 06+ models, they stepped it so it engaged around 6800rpm and disengaged around 6400rpm.

On the 14+ engines, it's definitely there, but not so much of an issue as it was if you were intent on engaging the Vtec accelerating round a corner on the older models.
98 VFR800 - 130,000 miles (sold)
08 VFR800 - 76,000 miles (sold)
14 VFR1200 - 20,000 miles
15 VFR800X - 44,000 miles (sold)
18 VFR800X - 9,000 miles

Online v8guy

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #6 on: February 13, 2018, 10:11:39 PM
*Originally Posted by Skids [+]
On the 14+ engines, it's definitely there
I sometimes really notice it kick in, but usually it's reasonably discrete. Never really figured why or when this happens, but my theory is that it occurs when the engine's colder. I don't tend to go much over 6k rpm until it's warm, but on my regular route home from a client I had to gas it onto the A3 not so long after firing it up, and I often felt it really kick there.
Current: BMW R1200RS, 2003 Yamaha TDM900
Past: Honda CLR125, Honda CB500, Triumph Sprint Sport, Honda VFR750FS, Suzuki DRZ400SM, 2001 Triumph Speed Triple 955i, 2015 Honda VFR800X

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube" - HST

Online Skids

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #7 on: February 14, 2018, 05:56:34 AM
*Originally Posted by v8guy [+]
I sometimes really notice it kick in, but usually it's reasonably discrete. Never really figured why or when this happens, but my theory is that it occurs when the engine's colder. I don't tend to go much over 6k rpm until it's warm, but on my regular route home from a client I had to gas it onto the A3 not so long after firing it up, and I often felt it really kick there.

The Vtec will not work until the engine temp reaches 68 degrees C (don't quote me on that figure).  :028:
98 VFR800 - 130,000 miles (sold)
08 VFR800 - 76,000 miles (sold)
14 VFR1200 - 20,000 miles
15 VFR800X - 44,000 miles (sold)
18 VFR800X - 9,000 miles

Offline Si Click

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #8 on: February 15, 2018, 03:43:59 PM
I have the older model and am very happy with it.  I could afford to swap to the latest version if I wished, but for the life of me I cannot find a decent reason to do so.

I like the VTEC surge when overtaking.  My previous pre-VTEC VFR was totally linear which made it very predicatable and excellent in the wet, but lacked character.  Fuel economy is around 50mpg which will start to seem poor over the next few years as the latest bikes like the Tiger 800 come with 60-70+.

Luggage is not an issue for me.  I use a Givi topbox and occasional fit soft panniers.

The only aspect I did not like was the too soft rear suspension which was OK solo, but could bottom out two up.  I replaced with Nitron and am now very happy indeed.

The instrument cluster looks like something off a scooter and can be difficult to read.  But at least it doesn't leak.

Getting panels off is a PITA and changing bulbs almost as difficult.  I bought a HID conversion kit, but cannot find room to install it.

The standard seat is not ideal; uncomfortable, unsupportive and a bit slippy.  But aftermarket alternatives are available or someone like Tony Archer will fettle your original into something decent at a sensible price.

The footpeg position draws critisism as it is the same shortish seat-peg distance as the sport tourer VTEC and not the long, straighter leg expected by the adventure bike crowd.  For me I find it a unique and sporty stance that enables more spirited riding on road than would otherwise be possible.

Best of all they are very cheap as no one seemed to understand what a great bike it is.
Best Regards Dave
2012 Honda Crossrunner
1955 Triumph TR2
1999 Land Rover Discovery 2 TD5 ES

Offline Rico

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Re: Where does the new cross runner beat the original, and where not?
Reply #9 on: February 15, 2018, 08:37:25 PM
What an awesome reply, thanks Si Click  :028: honest and informativ
It all sounds good to me, 50 mpg is still pretty decent, and with a good sized tank it'll do a lot of miles between fill ups, which is the important thing for me. Newer bikes are improving a lot on that, but soon all combustion engine bikes will look extremely thirsty when they're replaced by electrics anyway!

The soft suspension on the back might be good for me anyway, since I'm rather, ahem, lean (10 stone).

The low prices are indeed very attractive, and it just so happens that I really like the idea of the bike. Very nice engine, do everything, no over the top styling, comfortable two-up, good luggage - perfect!

I'll be looking for some good deals next.

 



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