Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] [NO] [MY] Topic: What to look for when buying a CR  (Read 6394 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline MisterB

  • Crossrunner Junior
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: UK
What to look for when buying a CR
on: February 16, 2018, 08:59:08 PM
Hi all,

I test rode a 15 plate Crossrunner today and was generally very impressed. I don't like Honda's decision to switch the horn button & indicators - that will be a pain swapping from one bike to another. I didn't like the GPS mounted so low on the bars - it seems people are struggling to resolve this? And I felt too scrunched up (I'm 6'2") but I can see that peg lowering kits and taller seats have been used to good effect by others. I loved the ride, handling and engine, though, and the VTEC  :001:

So, are there any issues with the Crossrunner that I need to look out for if I head down this route please? I'm an all weather rider and the bike will be used for blood running (so I'd need to fit a Givi top box rack).

I've seen a few comments about condensation in the instruments - is this common?

Has anyone had their bike remapped to smoothen out the fuelling (not that it's bad as stock)?

Anything else?

Many thanks in advance  :002:

Online Skids

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 1212
  • Bike: 2018 800X
  • City / Town: Hitchin
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #1 on: February 17, 2018, 06:35:33 AM
The horn/turn signal switch doesn't phase me now I'm used to it, but then my other bike is the same. You'll make the odd error but your mind will soon cope with the change.

Not sure what the GPS issue is; mine is mounted on the bars and is perfect for me.  :027:

Lots of farkles available for the bike to make it your own!

No issues I am aware of; had mine 16 months and done about 15k miles on her since then, over the winter too. You'll need to wash her regularly over the winter as the build quality, though good, is not what it was 20 years ago, but still better than most other makes.

I briefly had a small, coin sized bit of condensation a month or so ago and it has not reappeared.

You think the map needs smoothing out?  :008:  You should have ridden earlier VFRs, now they needed it! But there are a few mods you can try; PAIR removal, O2 eliminators worked well on the previous engine so may on this too and you can always send the ECU off for some re-mapping.

I fitted Givi bars and Givi LEDs to enhance safety with the number of miles I do....worth considering. I did Blood Running a few years ago on my old 08 Vtec  :062:

 :400:
98 VFR800 - 130,000 miles (sold)
08 VFR800 - 76,000 miles (sold)
14 VFR1200 - 20,000 miles
15 VFR800X - 44,000 miles (sold)
18 VFR800X - 9,000 miles

Offline MisterB

  • Crossrunner Junior
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #2 on: February 17, 2018, 09:01:33 AM
Thanks Skids  :152:

The fuelling was pretty good but blood running in London is all in 20 or 30 mph limits with lots of traffic - any glitches in fuelling really show up then, especially when you're out for 4 hours in the wee small hours!

Likewise I rely on the sat nav when blood running and my preference is for it to be mounted higher up as I find it easier to view, especially with London traffic, taxis & pizza delivery mopeds coming at you from all directions!

Offline JohnG

  • Crossrunner Pro
  • ***
  • Posts: 120
  • Bike: '16 VFR800XF
  • City / Town: Weston-sup-Mare
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #3 on: February 17, 2018, 09:06:38 AM
*Originally Posted by MisterB [+]
Hi all,

I test rode a 15 plate Crossrunner today and was generally very impressed. I don't like Honda's decision to switch the horn button & indicators - that will be a pain swapping from one bike to another. I didn't like the GPS mounted so low on the bars - it seems people are struggling to resolve this? And I felt too scrunched up (I'm 6'2") but I can see that peg lowering kits and taller seats have been used to good effect by others. I loved the ride, handling and engine, though, and the VTEC  :001:

So, are there any issues with the Crossrunner that I need to look out for if I head down this route please? I'm an all weather rider and the bike will be used for blood running (so I'd need to fit a Givi top box rack).

I've seen a few comments about condensation in the instruments - is this common?

Has anyone had their bike remapped to smoothen out the fuelling (not that it's bad as stock)?

Anything else?

Many thanks in advance  :002:

Hi MisterB,

At first I had problems with the Horn Button and Indicators on my '16 CR as I also still run an '02 Blackbird, but after a very short time it became second nature and don't notice any problem at all now even when jumping from one bike to the other. Though in the early days did beep a few people when I meant to indicate.

Mod's - Jaws do the Footrest lowering kit but advertised for the Blackbird - works well. Another suggestion being that as the instrument panel is plastic and easily scratched, cover it with clear Fablon from Day-1. You won't notice any difference and it will prevent damage. I still have the GPS mounted on the Bars but fitted a taller set of RAM brackets, which has helped. Plus Givi Top Box, Panniers, Engine Bars and Driving Lights.

Re Fueling, no problems with mine though I still don't think the engine freed up completely or gave best performance until I had over 8,000 miles on the clock.

Hope this helps.

Offline v8guy

  • Crossrunner Master
  • ****
  • Posts: 294
  • Bike: 2015 R1200RS
  • City / Town: London
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #4 on: February 17, 2018, 10:06:37 AM
*Originally Posted by MisterB [+]
So, are there any issues with the Crossrunner that I need to look out for if I head down this route please? I'm an all weather rider and the bike will be used for blood running (so I'd need to fit a Givi top box rack).
A Givi M3 adaptor plate will bolt straight onto the grab bar extension used by the OEM top box adaptor, albeit with only two bolts holding it in place. I was a bit sceptical that it'd hold, but after 12k miles of carrying a heavy backpack in the Givi box, it's still solid.  :028:

For central London riding, fuel economy is going to very poor.. back in the day when I was riding my TDM in and out of Soho every day, fuel economy took a 25+% hit. So what is already not a particularly efficient bike is going to need filling up an awful lot.

The horn button swap.. hm. I've still yet to fully acclimatise to this design choice. I don't have an issue operating the indicators, but I often find myself furiously canceling them when I wish to express my distaste regarding another driver's behaviour. Not an effective means of expression, it turns out.

I found the suspension harsh, when set for a spirited ride. Whilst the front tyre gave great feedback, high-speed compressions were painful. I had front and rear re-valved and re-sprung and I'm subsequently a very happy rider.

I've had no issues with the fueling on mine.. perfectly smooth and very civilised in heavy traffic at low engine speeds. I've only ever ridden it with the Akrapovic can fitted though.. no idea how it is with Honda's can.

Overall, after 2 years and 12000 miles, I'm still delighted with it! That said, If I were using it every day in central London, I'm not so sure I'd put up with the fuel consumption and the size and weight of it. I switched to a DRZ400SM when I was regularly hitting Soho, and never looked back... but I didn't have to carry a great deal or do any real distance on that bike, thankfully!
Current: BMW R1200RS, 2003 Yamaha TDM900
Past: Honda CLR125, Honda CB500, Triumph Sprint Sport, Honda VFR750FS, Suzuki DRZ400SM, 2001 Triumph Speed Triple 955i, 2015 Honda VFR800X

"Being shot out of a cannon will always be better than being squeezed out of a tube" - HST

Offline Notgotone

  • Ex Member
  • Crossrunner Pro
  • *
  • Posts: 166
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #5 on: February 17, 2018, 11:29:07 AM
Hi MisterB can't help but think a NCX750 would have been a better choice for a work bike similar styling and economical twin, as for the CR not much going on as you will see from the forum no great tales of woe a few niggling problems and if you're not happy with the suspension like myself V8guy and Lampie have gone the route of changing it mine is still work in progress it can be expensive, a sw-motec bracket will bring the Gps up above the clocks and into easy view but it's heavy and will need the damper removed to make it work or make your own version, mine came with the small top box and panniers and I need all of it for a weeks tour due to the awkward shape internally for the same price a good set of aftermarket would be much better, the standard screen as on most bikes is fecking awful I'm in unhappy compromise stage with my current fitment I personally believe that all aftermarket screens should be available on try before you buy as it's an expensive mistake if it dose not suit you. After nearly a year of ownership and to be fair not that many miles I am overall happy with the bike coming from a CBF1000 I do miss the torque and tested a MT09 Tracer and a Tiger 1050 sport before settling on the CR which once the front end is sorted will see me to the end of my riding days.

Offline MisterB

  • Crossrunner Junior
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #6 on: February 17, 2018, 09:09:48 PM
*Originally Posted by JohnG [+]
Hi MisterB,

At first I had problems with the Horn Button and Indicators on my '16 CR as I also still run an '02 Blackbird, but after a very short time it became second nature and don't notice any problem at all now even when jumping from one bike to the other. Though in the early days did beep a few people when I meant to indicate.

Mod's - Jaws do the Footrest lowering kit but advertised for the Blackbird - works well. Another suggestion being that as the instrument panel is plastic and easily scratched, cover it with clear Fablon from Day-1. You won't notice any difference and it will prevent damage. I still have the GPS mounted on the Bars but fitted a taller set of RAM brackets, which has helped. Plus Givi Top Box, Panniers, Engine Bars and Driving Lights.

Re Fueling, no problems with mine though I still don't think the engine freed up completely or gave best performance until I had over 8,000 miles on the clock.

Hope this helps.

Thanks JohnG. The Jaws footpeg lowering plates sound perfect!

Offline MisterB

  • Crossrunner Junior
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #7 on: February 17, 2018, 09:17:52 PM
*Originally Posted by v8guy [+]
A Givi M3 adaptor plate will bolt straight onto the grab bar extension used by the OEM top box adaptor, albeit with only two bolts holding it in place. I was a bit sceptical that it'd hold, but after 12k miles of carrying a heavy backpack in the Givi box, it's still solid.  :028:

For central London riding, fuel economy is going to very poor.. back in the day when I was riding my TDM in and out of Soho every day, fuel economy took a 25+% hit. So what is already not a particularly efficient bike is going to need filling up an awful lot.

The horn button swap.. hm. I've still yet to fully acclimatise to this design choice. I don't have an issue operating the indicators, but I often find myself furiously canceling them when I wish to express my distaste regarding another driver's behaviour. Not an effective means of expression, it turns out.

I found the suspension harsh, when set for a spirited ride. Whilst the front tyre gave great feedback, high-speed compressions were painful. I had front and rear re-valved and re-sprung and I'm subsequently a very happy rider.

I've had no issues with the fueling on mine.. perfectly smooth and very civilised in heavy traffic at low engine speeds. I've only ever ridden it with the Akrapovic can fitted though.. no idea how it is with Honda's can.

Overall, after 2 years and 12000 miles, I'm still delighted with it! That said, If I were using it every day in central London, I'm not so sure I'd put up with the fuel consumption and the size and weight of it. I switched to a DRZ400SM when I was regularly hitting Soho, and never looked back... but I didn't have to carry a great deal or do any real distance on that bike, thankfully!

Thanks v8guy. I'll have a look at the Givi plate - I use a 58l Trekker Outback box which is huge! The advantage is that a blood box fits inside  :001:

As a bit of background I have stage 4 colon cancer so fuel economy is not such an issue for me! I have another bike which I tend to use a lot but I don't really want to leave it in London, even for short periods during the night. I only generally do 2 blood running shifts a month so the second bike will be for fun as well and I'm ideally looking for something different to my current twin, hence I'm looking at the Crossrunner & the MT-09 Tracer.

I rode a Tiger 800xrx immediately before riding the Crossrunner and I thought the Tiger had a harsher ride and poorer handling - it seemed much heavier at the front, though it was a better fit size wise.

As for the weight, I've just sold my Pan European ST1300 - almost anything after that is light!  :008:

Offline MisterB

  • Crossrunner Junior
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #8 on: February 17, 2018, 09:23:51 PM
*Originally Posted by Notgotone [+]
Hi MisterB can't help but think a NCX750 would have been a better choice for a work bike similar styling and economical twin, as for the CR not much going on as you will see from the forum no great tales of woe a few niggling problems and if you're not happy with the suspension like myself V8guy and Lampie have gone the route of changing it mine is still work in progress it can be expensive, a sw-motec bracket will bring the Gps up above the clocks and into easy view but it's heavy and will need the damper removed to make it work or make your own version, mine came with the small top box and panniers and I need all of it for a weeks tour due to the awkward shape internally for the same price a good set of aftermarket would be much better, the standard screen as on most bikes is fecking awful I'm in unhappy compromise stage with my current fitment I personally believe that all aftermarket screens should be available on try before you buy as it's an expensive mistake if it dose not suit you. After nearly a year of ownership and to be fair not that many miles I am overall happy with the bike coming from a CBF1000 I do miss the torque and tested a MT09 Tracer and a Tiger 1050 sport before settling on the CR which once the front end is sorted will see me to the end of my riding days.

Thanks Notgotone. As above, I only go into London twice a month, the rest of the time I'd be using it just for fun, including group ride-outs and IAM rides  :001:

I've seen comments about the SW-Motech sat nav bracket, though I'm struggling to find anyone on the forum that's happy with it...

As for screens, I've yet to find a bike that I've been happy with the stock screen - I just assume now that changing it is a given!

I considered the CBF1000, a heck of a lot of bike for the money. It just seems a bit...dull...and I'm ideally looking for something with a bit more room for my 6'2" frame  :002:

Offline MisterB

  • Crossrunner Junior
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Country: UK
Re: What to look for when buying a CR
Reply #9 on: February 17, 2018, 09:35:28 PM
I've just looked at the Givi PDF instructions for fitting their rack and it shows 4 bolts holding the frame to the bike, and 4 bolts holding the top box adapter plate to the frame - am I missing something? Is this different if the Honda top box is fitted?

Oh and can I ask about the Honda heated grips too please? I had them on at level 5 on my test ride and they barely got warm - I presume they should be better than that???

 



recent