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Offline Gramps99

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Handlebar angle.
on: June 06, 2020, 10:54:27 AM
Heres one for skids :002:  I bought my CR used, a low miles 2016 model. It soon became clear that the previous owner was probably shorter than me. The bike had been lowered, brake pedal was in a weird position etc.
I am now wondering about the bars. I think they may have been lowered by rolling them down a little towards the tank. My  hanguards only just miss the tank on full lock despite being adjusted to their highest position.
It occurs to me that maybe that is because the  bars are too low. I cannot find any line up marks on the bars like Ive had on other bikes. Any ideas how to check bars are in the original position?
Thanks

Online Skids

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #1 on: June 06, 2020, 02:06:39 PM
Haha, it's very kind of you to think that, but I'm no guru or anything, I'm not much of a mechanic either. I guess all I've done is be around VFR's for a fair few years.

I've not heard of the bars being moved on a Crossie before so I'm afraid I can't help you with that either.  :003:
1 VFR simply isnt enough! Crossrunner for commuting, VFR1200F for summer fun.
98 VFR800 - 130000 miles (sold) 08 VFR800 - 76000 miles (sold) 15 VFR800X - 44000 miles (sold)
14 VFR1200 - 20000 miles
18 VFR800X - 9000 miles

Offline AndreyEvteev

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #2 on: July 05, 2020, 06:27:22 PM
Right,

I have not got a Crossrunner yet but I've owned a few bikes and had been riding mountainbikes for about 15 years.

Honestly, had to register to reply to this thread.

Take is as my personal opinion please. But, the only things that really matter with the handlebar rotation are:

- Whether it does not catch anything when turning from lock to lock.
- Whether you're comfortable with it.

They do set it at factory in a specific standard way but there's literally _nothing_ (I think) apart from 2 points above which prevents you from loosening 2 bolts out of 4 which fix the bars in the clamps, rotating it to your taste, and tightening the bolts.

Overall, having come to motorbiking after many years of cycling I'm amazed by how unflexible is bike-rider fit in the motorcycling world compared to cycling, and how many riders are wary of making even small changes which can potentially have quite beneficial effects on their riding. Worth  mentioning that I have a bad back which means I'm way more sensitive to this than most but possibly this is the reason I've had to look into this topic in greater detail and compare the 2 worlds.

I'm happy to be told I'm missing something - actually, would be quite interested in this. But when it comes to bicycles, there are (imagine this!) frame sizes of the same model, and they're very relevant and they do work. Now, it's absolutely not practical to do this for motorbikes, but surely there must be something that could make fitting a bike to a biker easier?

I've personally found that trying to figure out which aftermarket handlebars are better fit, and how to replace the whole thingy, and which bar ends to use, and what to do about the peg position, and many many other things are unnecessarily difficult.

Every effing manufacturer will have their own bar end mount system, their own bar mounts, unque bar dimensions, and a ton of other quirks. And don't get me started on the cable lengths!

Sure, there are Rox risers (amazing bit of kit IMO) and many other things including peg lowering blocks (often custom for the specific model, again!), and they do work, but woldn't it be easier if manufacturers started introducing some degree of adjustment in the handlebar position and something on top of saddle heights as standard?

This all is so much easier with mountainbikes. There are just simple standards for everything, every manufacturer publishes the frame dimensions for all sizes and you can always improve the fit using standard components. This world is built around the biker. With motorbikes, it's not necessarily the case. I think this has lots of reasons - say, building a motorbike is much more complicated - you have an order of magnitue more variables to account for including the engine and suspension etc etc.

Having said that, I think there's lots of inertia and 'status quo' in the motorbiking community on this topic - I guess this is the reason I'm writing this. People just accept that the bike either fits or does not and often are very cautious about doing very simple things which may really help.

At the end of the day, a handlebars is just an aluminium hollow tube with some tapering and bends and a few holes for switchgear. There does not have to be the 'right' way to fix it in the mounts. Just loosen the bolts, rotate it until it feels better, and tighten the bolts (this is in fact important! :)) and go for a ride. If it feels better - cool, if it does not, go back to where it was.

Hope this helps and sorry for the rant :)

Online Crosspurpose

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #3 on: July 05, 2020, 10:49:56 PM
I bought my CR new last year and, amongst other things, had the Honda hand guards fitted before taking delivery. It struck me after a while that the hand guards did little to prevent wind blast from chilling the back of my hands and also that my arms seemed to be too straight properly to take full advantage of the bike's excellent handling. So one of the jobs I did during lockdown was to reposition the bars further back and to adjust the angle of the clutch and brake levers. This has had two beneficial effects: (1) the hand guards are now more effective and, more importantly (2) I now have the correct position for proper control of the bike with arms relaxed and at the correct angle. It has transformed for the better the ease of handling and control of the bike and has also made it less tiring to ride.
I know what is meant by the fixed position of the bars on some bikes. IIRC the BMW F800GT I had a few years ago had dots aligned between bars and top yoke. One of the many reasons I sold it was because I couldn't get comfortable with the position of the bars and couldn't adjust them. On my CR the bars were well forward when I took delivery, but I believe that this was simply how it was set up at PDI, not a specified position. My advice is the same, simply re-position them to suit you and your riding position, seat height etc, as long as you can turn the bars from lock to lock without anything hitting the tank or other bodywork and engine revs don't change because there's no slack in the throttle cable. The bars on the CR are meant to be adjustable, I would say.
I always adjust things like gear levers, brake pedal height etc where I can; there's little worse than having to ng to adapt to an unnatural (for me) position of key controls. I'm saying nothing about the indicator switch position on current Hondas...... :002:

Offline hantsman

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #4 on: July 07, 2020, 06:00:46 PM
all our bones are not the same,
 So you have to do what is needed to adapt the bike the best you can.
 :169:
still swimming in my fish bowl

Offline Haddo

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #5 on: July 08, 2020, 09:10:34 AM
Yep just adjust bars & levers to suit. First thing I've done on any bike is replace bars with my prefered pull back/ width/ height. but the CR bars were spot on believe it or not I just rolled them back a tad for height & the angle was perfect for my wrists which is important for touring. Then I worry about seat comfort but as mentioned you will need to re- adjust if you actually change seat height. Notice guys riding one handed & shaking the other hand from pain, not for me once it starts it don't stop. Standing now & then I can handle.
Last Edit: July 08, 2020, 09:25:17 AM by Haddo

Offline BarneyS

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #6 on: July 09, 2020, 08:47:20 PM
Whereas mine had been pulled back to such a degree that the fairing got damaged and then lifted a bit so only the hand guards got in the way.

I used to get numb hands and pins and needles until I rolled them forward again and now learning to love the bike, guess the previous owner was different to me.

I was surprised, as you were, that there is no factory mark or notch.... after all Mr Honda has made a few nikes....

Experiment, enjoy!

Barney

Offline Haddo

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #7 on: July 11, 2020, 02:53:26 PM
Indicators like most pro taper bars as a  prefered position marker maybe but a factory standard position & style of bar to suit everyone will never exist. Probably why they didnt bother.

Offline Gramps99

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #8 on: July 13, 2020, 12:32:34 PM
*Originally Posted by AndreyEvteev [+]
Right,

I have not got a Crossrunner yet but I've owned a few bikes and had been riding mountainbikes for about 15 years.

Honestly, had to register to reply to this thread.

Take is as my personal opinion please. But, the only things that really matter with the handlebar rotation are:

- Whether it does not catch anything when turning from lock to lock.
- Whether you're comfortable with it.

They do set it at factory in a specific standard way but there's literally _nothing_ (I think) apart from 2 points above which prevents you from loosening 2 bolts out of 4 which fix the bars in the clamps, rotating it to your taste, and tightening the bolts.

Overall, having come to motorbiking after many years of cycling I'm amazed by how unflexible is bike-rider fit in the motorcycling world compared to cycling, and how many riders are wary of making even small changes which can potentially have quite beneficial effects on their riding. Worth  mentioning that I have a bad back which means I'm way more sensitive to this than most but possibly this is the reason I've had to look into this topic in greater detail and compare the 2 worlds.

I'm happy to be told I'm missing something - actually, would be quite interested in this. But when it comes to bicycles, there are (imagine this!) frame sizes of the same model, and they're very relevant and they do work. Now, it's absolutely not practical to do this for motorbikes, but surely there must be something that could make fitting a bike to a biker easier?

I've personally found that trying to figure out which aftermarket handlebars are better fit, and how to replace the whole thingy, and which bar ends to use, and what to do about the peg position, and many many other things are unnecessarily difficult.

Every effing manufacturer will have their own bar end mount system, their own bar mounts, unque bar dimensions, and a ton of other quirks. And don't get me started on the cable lengths!

Sure, there are Rox risers (amazing bit of kit IMO) and many other things including peg lowering blocks (often custom for the specific model, again!), and they do work, but woldn't it be easier if manufacturers started introducing some degree of adjustment in the handlebar position and something on top of saddle heights as standard?

This all is so much easier with mountainbikes. There are just simple standards for everything, every manufacturer publishes the frame dimensions for all sizes and you can always improve the fit using standard components. This world is built around the biker. With motorbikes, it's not necessarily the case. I think this has lots of reasons - say, building a motorbike is much more complicated - you have an order of magnitue more variables to account for including the engine and suspension etc etc.

Having said that, I think there's lots of inertia and 'status quo' in the motorbiking community on this topic - I guess this is the reason I'm writing this. People just accept that the bike either fits or does not and often are very cautious about doing very simple things which may really help.

At the end of the day, a handlebars is just an aluminium hollow tube with some tapering and bends and a few holes for switchgear. There does not have to be the 'right' way to fix it in the mounts. Just loosen the bolts, rotate it until it feels better, and tighten the bolts (this is in fact important! :)) and go for a ride. If it feels better - cool, if it does not, go back to where it was.

Hope this helps and sorry for the rant :)


Fantastic rant. I thoroughly approve.

Offline Gramps99

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Re: Handlebar angle.
Reply #9 on: July 13, 2020, 12:38:26 PM
Its taken some time but finally rememered it was a kawasaki I owned that had the tiniest little alignment dots on the bars. I just wondered if someone here would point out something similar on the wonderful crossrunner.